Sexual health for lesbian & bisexual women advice

Sexual Health & Lesbian Sex

Sexual health for lesbian & bisexual women

There is no such thing as safe sex – unless you choose to never have sex with anyone, ever, of course.

If you want to enjoy hot, healthy frolics on a regular basis, with one or more partners, what you need to consider is safer sex.

You may have heard that old rumour about sexually transmitted infections (STIs) not passing from woman to woman?

Sorry peeps, but it’s just not true. Your peach can most definitely catch a variety of unpleasant infections from your latest fruity squeeze.

The risk of HIV transmission during girl + girl sex is low in comparison to other couple combos; girl + guy / guy + guy.

However, other STDs like BV, Herpes and thrush are just as common for lesbians as for women who have sex with men.

A recent survey  revealed lesbians do get STD’s but are often not tested.

Any sexy activities that involve an exchange of bodily fluids can transmit an infection, simple as that.

Oral sex, be that cunnilingus or rimming, is not only massively pleasurable, but also a potentially risky business.

Dental Dam
Dental Dam

By covering her peach and neighbouring areas with a dental dam, you are already on much safer ground. Dams are particularly important if you want to go down on your woman during her period, as infected blood is highly contagious.

Vaginal and anal finger play & fisting can be risky too, so latex gloves are an excellent way of keeping sores covered and body fluids off skin.

Keep your nails trimmed to avoid breaking the latex and/or scratching delicate skin.

Always opt for a water-based lubricant, as anything oil-based is unsuitable for using with latex. Vaseline and baby oil are absolute no-no’s, as not only will they break down the latex barrier, they’ll also cause unpleasant vaginal itching and who wants that?

If you want to share your toys, remember to always cover them with condoms and changing to fresh ones each time you swap toys around between partners. You can even get latex-free condomsthese days – perfect for those with latex allergies!

A certain level of personal hygiene may be a given, but did you know that brushing your teeth immediately before sex isn’t the greatest idea as it can encourage bleeding? 

Check that your mouthwash is free of salicyates (aspirin) too, as this can make your gums bleed. Instead, just pop a mint and you’re good to go!

STI’s are non-discriminatory, meaning that all genders and sexualities can be affected.

If you notice suspicious symptoms such as thick/smelly/frothy vaginal discharge; pain during sex or while peeing; sores on or around your genitals, or spotting between your periods, we say it’s time to book an appointment at the local GUM clinic.

Should you have the bad fortune to be diagnosed with an STI, you are obligated to contact any/all lovers you may have infected as they will need screening too. Sharing the news of a positive STI diagnosis can feel awkward (read: mortifying!), but remember: an STI means ‘bad luck’, not ‘loose morals’.

 

We know that there are unhelpful doctors who don’t feel that lesbians are at risk of cervical cancer 

…and therefore ‘don’t need smear tests’.

This is a load of tosh, and you should either insist or simply register with a different GP. All sexually active women need routine smear tests, regardless of sexual preference. This includes women who are not regularly active, or those who have had sex only once or twice.

Now, don’t let all this STI chat put you off sexy-time – just make sure you stock up on dams, gloves and lubes, and treat every peach (including your own) with responsibility and respect!

4 thoughts on “Sexual Health & Lesbian Sex”

  1. Funnily enough, the postman just delivered a letter asking me to make an appointment for a smear – what are the chances of that happening! O_o

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